Relationship between the family history of cancer with the chance of occurring breast, ovarian and cervical cancers in Tabari Cohort Population, a case-control study

Amir-Mohammad Karimi, (2019) Relationship between the family history of cancer with the chance of occurring breast, ovarian and cervical cancers in Tabari Cohort Population, a case-control study. Doctoral thesis, Sari Faculty of Medicine.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Background and aim: Gynecological cancers are one of the most important topics in oncology and social medicine and account for one third of all cancers in women. Identifying high-risk groups and paying attention to a positive family history of cancers will be valuable in the patient's relatives. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between family history of cancer and the risk of breast, ovarian and cervical cancers in Tabari cohort population. Materials and Methods: Due to the limited number of cases, their selection was based on census method and the control group was selected based on random sampling from two to four times more than the case group. The number of patients with breast cancer was 53, twice that of the control group, 39 cases with cervical cancer, three times the number of controls, and 17 cases with four times the control group Was considered. Subjects were matched with controls based on marital status, age, age at first pregnancy, number of pregnancies, history of abortion, lactation age, menarche age, age of menopause, hormone therapy, socioeconomic status, and area of residence. Exposure records of different cancers in first degree relatives and case and control groups were determined based on Tabari cohort registration phase data. results: In this study, based on logistic regression analysis, only the variables of education, menopause and place of residence were able to predict the dependent variable significantly. With the increase in education, the chances of being in a group with cervix cancer increase. (Odds Ratio was 5.425 and 1.135, respectively, in junior high and high school and high school, respectively). Also, data show that being menopausal and living in the village increases the chance of cervical cancer. (Odds Ratio, 43.494 and 133.213, respectively) This analysis of ovarian cancer was such that only the menopausal and living variables were able to predict the dependent variable significantly. Being menopausal and living in the village increases the chance of ovarian cancer. (Odds Ratio, 12.337 and 38.516, respectively) And for cancer, only the variables of age at menarche, menopause, family history of breast cancer, and place of residence were able to predict the dependent variable significantly. Thus, with increasing menstrual age, the chances of being in the group with cancer decreased (Odds Ratio = 0.369) or in other words with decreasing menstrual age the chances of being in the group with breast cancer increased (Odds Ratio = 2.710). The data also show that being menopausal, living in the village and having a history of breast cancer increases the chance of breast cancer. (Odds Ratio, 2.891, 9.912 and 10.260, respectively). conclusion: According to the results of this study and other studies, variables such as age at menopause, place of residence, especially rural people, and family history appear to be involved in the incidence of gynecological cancers as some of the risk factors for gynecological cancers are Preventive, lifestyle change in these cases can be considered as one of the prevention recommendations. Regular examinations in people with a positive family history can be helpful in timely diagnosis. Keywords: Gynecological cancers, Family history, Tabari cohort

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences > School of Medicine
Depositing User: Unnamed user with email eprints@mazums.ac.ir
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2019 06:59
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2019 06:59
URI: http://eprints.mazums.ac.ir/id/eprint/5215

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item